.Showing results for abed bhai brac we believe any uni-coalition with a future needs an ai map- we don't necessarily endorse this map's classifications or entries but whats the point of learning in 2020s if you have no view of what ai can be humanised? congrats topbots for mapmaking - a somewhat randon tour of ai - fast catalogue AI unicorns
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bard & WHOSE ALUMI VALUE YOUTH MOST
.abed.sorosbotsteincrowschwarzmanjack mafounders of tencent..........
brac u and osun.Y1 Y2 Y3..y.yy..............
ceu & osun.y.Y4.y..y.............
bard & osun..yY5.Y5.y..............
arizona state & osun.y.y.y..Y6.............
schwarzman.
Tsinghua
MIT
Oxford (Cambridge)
....Y7.............
jma education ......Y8............
tencent education........Y9...........
africa : ashesi u, osun, new uni collaby.y.y.
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Y10 New uni mid east.................
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-did shakespeare mean that while it takes 2 to tango it takes 3 to : generate , to map, to play? which roles should daughter mother and father exchange through ages of loving each other: enlighten rain (valuing water), thunder (global climate adaptability) - we will asking your help to link this co-blog into missing "open systems" curricula sustainable youth need to urgently demand the 7th economy celebrates if they are to be the sustainability generation whose moral sentiments and humainsing of machine intel is to save our species from extinction- related bard references To Be or Not to Be "" life but a poor player .... what your bard's most valuable script- chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

sampler from creative youth olympiads of summer 2015 futurecapitalism.tv

Monday, September 7, 2020

what is education doing to children everywhere - part 1 hong kong

 fortunately hong kong is on the case at www.yidanprize.org by tencent's c-founder

As Hong Kong’s busy children return to schools, time to rethink the point of education

  • We should stop being so overly competitive that we break our children and risk mental health problems. Teaching kindness and consideration instead would increase resilience – and the chance of happiness

Primary school students in a Wan Chai school pray for the Covid-19 pandemic to ease before class on June 8. Photo: Nora TamPrimary school students in a Wan Chai school pray for the Covid-19 pandemic to ease before class on June 8. Photo: Nora Tam
Primary school students in a Wan Chai school pray for the Covid-19 pandemic to ease before class on June 8. Photo: Nora Tam
Hong Kong’s schools are 
set to reopen
 on a phased basis in a week or so. That is good news indeed, especially for parents, who have had to shoulder more responsibilities with their children learning from home. In addition to a perhaps new-found appreciation for teachers, Hongkongers can breathe a sigh of relief now that we seem to have Covid-19 under control.
Understandably, some educators and parents are 
worried
 that students – especially those in critical years who have academic qualification tests to take and scores to worry about – not being able to catch up.
It has been the norm for Hong Kong students to spend almost every waking hour engaged in the task of joyless learning – at school, at 
tuition centres
, and at home with homework. We are a city obsessed with “winning at the starting line”. With the focus on training our students to stay ahead of every curve, falling behind is not an option.
Parents would pay whatever they can afford to make sure their children beat everyone else’s. And all this begins at a ridiculously young age – there are 
interview coaching classes
 for little ones who really should be playing full-time. But what seemed to be preparing our students for the cutthroat competition of the “real world” has unfortunate repercussions.
A child cries in the arms of his mother as they take part in a class preparing toddlers for kindergarten interviews in Hong Kong in 2015. Photo: Reuters
A child cries in the arms of his mother as they take part in a class preparing toddlers for kindergarten interviews in Hong Kong in 2015. Photo: Reuters
Study after study has pointed to the obvious: that our students are in 
distress
. By 2015, the rise in student suicides had alarmed even our lawmakers, prompting a special education panel and legislators to suggest that schools put greater emphasis on non-academic achievements.
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This fact – that our children are not OK – is not news. It’s tragic and remains a problem. Our education system has its share of problems. The liberal studies curriculum, for instance, 
has been blamed
 for supposedly playing a role in Hong Kong’s months-long protests. But that is a topic for another day.

What most people can agree on is that our education system has become so obsessed with academic performance that the stress placed on our students is enormous. There is very little self-satisfaction that can be derived from a system that piles on the pressure when children reach nursery age.

Being taught to win at all costs is detrimental to our children’s development. When the importance of teaching and nurturing kindness and empathy is neglected, it is no wonder that they find 
happiness and contentment
 so unattainable.

Hong Kong’s education system needs a complete overhaul, from how we prioritise what we teach our children, to how they are taught, to the weight given to exam and test scores.

They say that crises are opportunities in disguise. Now may be the time for all of us to do right by our children. Being competitive to the point of breaking our children and ourselves, and suffering from a whole slew of 
mental health issues
 must be the absolute worst we can do to our children.

Instead, teaching them to be kind and considerate would equip them with the tools to be more resilient – the pathways to their success in the future.

Hong Kong secondary students learn online amid coronavirus fears
Covid-19 has forced us to confront uncomfortable truths and 
rethink
 how we live our lives. The message that we are “stronger together” has resonance across borders. Now, is the point of education to get ahead at all costs? There must be room to learn to connect, understand, empathise with and care for others.

Cheer our children on to – in the words of the late Dr Maya Angelou – “be the rainbow in someone’s cloud”, because it is worth infinitely more than any pot of gold.

Alice Wu is a political consultant and a former associate director of the Asia Pacific Media Network at UCLA

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